Dave was extremely professional but more importantly I was treated as a person not a case. He always returned calls and emails in a very timely manner. I would definitely recommend Dave to help with legal needs! -Jennifer S.

As someone who never had a lawyer, David made everything as simple as possible. He is very easy to communicate with and provides all the answers and support you will ever need. If I ever need a lawyer again, David will be my first choice to contact. -Andrew

I was falsely accused of something and had an order filed against me. Ben represented me during court and successfully had the order dismissed. He also went above and beyond to make sure it would not show up on my record. – Brittany.

Home » Blog » Criminal Defense Attorney Ben Raybin was quoted in Tennessean article regarding Gov. Bill Lee Loosening Requirements for Pardons and Commutations.

Criminal Defense Attorney Ben Raybin was quoted in Tennessean article regarding Gov. Bill Lee Loosening Requirements for Pardons and Commutations.

Share

Since less than 6% of clemency applications in Tennessee made it to the Governor’s desk in 2018, Tennessee’s new Governor, Bill Lee,  has made a handful of tweaks to the clemency process that could have a tremendous impact.

The changes made are as follows:

  • Pardon applications shifted from requiring “a specific and compelling need for a pardon” to requiring “a compelling reason for a pardon.”
  • Commutation applications removed the rigid legal standard that offenders show “clear and convincing evidence” of rehabilitation. It added that rehabilitation should be measured “relative to the nature of the offense(s) committed.”
  • Exoneration applications eliminated the “clear and convincing evidence” standard.

Nashville Defense Attorney Ben Raybin said that “These changes are a step in the right direction and are reflective of Gov. Lee’s commitment to criminal justice reform.”

You can read more about this topic on the Tennessean’s post “Gov. Bill Lee loosens requirements for pardons, commutations; defense attorneys hopeful